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Wouldn't the air pushing the flat part of the wing force it into the ground?

The standard textbook explanation of how airplanes fly is a considerable oversimplification.

To this end, is it possible to have a hotdog-shaped planet, or will rotational and orbital forces (and others? The main reason is that astronomical objects are usually formed by smaller pieces coming together.

Initially, very small stuff (dust size) sticks together by colliding and since this is a random process, is just as likely to stick a little piece on any part of a larger piece with which it collides; therefore the initial "seeds" tend to be roughly spherical.

Regarding your website, I certainly will not critique it because I know that the world is full of persons with their own personal theories of the universe desperately seeking attention for their ideas.

I will acknowledge that no theory is immune from mathematical errors which, even if present, do not necessarily negate the validity of the theory.

If it were hot dog shaped, gravity would pull harder on the ends than the sides and it would tend back toward spherical shape.

I read a good analogy somewhere: Suppose you want to build a building 1000 stories high, essentially a nonspherical bump on our essentially spherical earth.

What would happen if a car was traveling at the speed of light, and then turned on it's headlights? A light source is 2m below the surface of the water in a calm pool.

You would likely fail because gravity would cause it to collapse under its own weight.

The earth is actually slightly oblate, that is fatter at the equator than the poles, because it is rotating and the centrifugal force pulls it out at the equator.

In addition to the Bernoulli effect to which you refer, the "angle of attack" is also important.

I have included details in a previously answered question.

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